The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Fox's Rocky Horror Picture Show: Grade Laverne Cox & Co.'s Performances

Fox kicked off Halloween early on Thursday with a jump to left, a step to the right, and — oh, you know the rest.

After more than a year of antici…pation, the network finally lifted the curtain on its highly-anticipated live production of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, a beloved cult musical about a mad scientist, his sexy new creation, and a pair of pitch-perfect WASPs unfortunate enough to stumble into their weird little world.

Teeming with small-screen talent, Fox’s two-hour production took most — if not all — of its cues from the 1975 Tim Curry film version, though it should be noted that Rocky Horror originated as a stage musical two years prior.

Recording artist Ivy Levan got the party started with a sexy, soulful rendition of “Science Fiction/Double Feature,” paving the way for lovebirds Brad (Liv and Maddie‘s Ryan McCartan) and Janet (Eye Candy‘s Victoria Justice) to perform their ironically earnest signature song “Dammit Janet.” And by the time the couple hit those final notes on “There’s a Light (Over at the Frankenstein Place),” their living nightmare had officially begun.

That’s when things really got weird. Bald-capped butler Riff Raff (Penny Dreadful‘s Reeve Carney) and housemaid Magenta (Grandfathered‘s Christina Milian) welcomed the unlucky travelers into their mysterious mansion with a high-energy performance of “The Time Warp,” an iconic number which also showcased the killer pipes — and tap-dancing skillz — Annaleigh Ashford (Masters of Sex) as rock ‘n’ roll groupie Columbia.

Then came the main event: the introduction of Laverne Cox (Orange Is the New Black) as Dr. Frank-N-Furter, the evening’s eccentric benefactor — not to mention self-proclaimed “sweet transvestite” — and Staz Nair (Game of Thrones) as Rocky, the good doc’s pec-tacular newborn specimen.

What followed was a madcap flurry of off-the-wall numbers (“Toucha, Toucha, Toucha, Touch Me!”), exciting guests (Adam Lambert! Ben Vereen!), and insane plot twists (aliens?!), all of which make up the unique experience that is The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

You’ve already read TVLine’s review — Dave Nemetz gave the production a favorable “B,” though he insisted Cox’s casting was the production’s Achilles’ heel — so now, we want to hear yours:

Which numbers did you love best, and which left you feeling done in? Who deserves the title of Rocky Horror‘s MVP, and who should never have been invited to the party in the first place? Grade the overall production below, then drop a comment with your thoughts.