Blindspot Season 2

Blindspot on the Bubble: Keep or Cut?

By mid-May, the broadcast networks must make some tough calls as to which series will return for the 2017-18 TV season, and which… won’t.

As that deadline draws near, TVLine is singling out a few “bubble” shows and sizing up their prospects — based in large part on creative strides (and stumbles) and future potential, but also with a requisite nod to cold, hard numbers.

Next up is NBC’s latest Freshman Hit-turned-Sophomore Slumper.

THE SHOW | NBC’s Blindspot (Wednesdays at 8/7c)

THE CASE FOR KEEPING | Blindspot has always been at its most compelling when Jane actually gets clued into her mysterious past and isn’t left to stare, helpless, at the events happening around her. The series has leaned into that storytelling technique much more in Season 2; by giving Jane a meatier backstory (and actual relatives!), it’s much easier to invest in the myriad conspiracies she and the FBI team find themselves investigating.

The show also finds itself at a difficult crossroads, tone-wise — half-serialized crime mystery, half-Tattoo of the Week procedural. When it strikes the right balance, Blindspot is on. Sure, Jane’s body art is fun to look at and dissect, but at the center of it all is a much darker, more intriguing storyline — and the series has killed off juuuust enough major characters to legitimately leave you on the edge of your seat in the final moments of each episode.

But perhaps the best case for Blindspot‘s renewal is the story that hasn’t yet been told. Despite the breadcrumbs that the series’ writers have laid in regards to Jane’s past (and her connection to Weller), the show seems to be nowhere near delivering the closure that viewers would crave if it were cancelled. At the very least, invested fans have earned even a truncated, loose-end-tying Season 3.

THE CASE FOR CUTTING | Just as Revolution dropped nearly half its ratings with its own Season 2 move from Mondays-at-10 to Wednesday’s lead-off spot, Blindspot is thus far down 40 percent from its freshman run. Averaging a 1.1 in the demo — and recently sliding as low as 0.9 — it ranks No. 8 out of NBC’s 10 dramas, besting only Grimm‘s farewell run and “event series” Emerald City.

As for the storytelling, even viewers who’ve watched Blindspot since Jane crawled out of that duffel bag wouldn’t be faulted for losing track of its many, many subplots. What started off as a story about Jane Doe, and the FBI agent tasked with protecting her, has morphed into something much more complex — and that’s made it increasingly difficult to follow.

Vote below, and then state your own case for keeping or cutting Blindspot.