The Great Indoors Joel McHale Season 1 Preview

Joel McHale: The Great Indoors Similar to 'How I Felt About Community'

Though it doesn’t feature alternate timelines or extensive meta humor, CBS’ upcoming The Great Indoors comedy rang a few Greendale bells for star Joel McHale.

The workplace comedy, which follows McHale’s outdoor-magazine reporter character as he transitions to a job in the publication’s millenial-run digital department, is “a big sandbox,” McHale told an audience Wednesday at the Television Critics Association summer press tour. “That’s how I felt about Community when I first read it.”

McHale, whose most recent TV gig was playing conspiracy theorist/Scully romancer Tad O’Malley in Fox’s X-Files revival, said that the role of a technology-challenged veteran journalist forced to interact with a staff full of 20-somethings was appealing on several levels.

Plus, “I’ve always wanted to do a four-camera sitcom,” he added. “You always hear the criticism about them, but I believe they are funny.”

McHale joined castmates Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Christine Ko, Shaun Brown, Chris Williams, Stephen Fry and Susannah Fielding — as well as executive producers Chris Harris and Mike Gibbons — for a panel discussion about the workplace comedy. A few highlights:

* Harris and Gibbons, particularly, took heat from some millennial reporters for describing millennials as being “coddled” and insisting on an “overly PC workplace.” Gibbons insisted that the series pokes equal fun of the older employees, represented by McHale and Fry, and that the concept came out of “me being made fun of by millennials” while he was headwriter at The Late Late Show With James Corden. “It just occurred to me, when is 40-something the new 80?” He added, “There’s going to be an equal amount of jokes… made at the Gen-Xers and how they are made to feel so old so quickly.”

* Some of the younger cast members then jumped in to defend the series’ humor. “Millennials saying it’s offensive to millennials plays into what we’re talking about,” Brown said, laughing. Ko later added that the the writing staff was very open to input from the series’ own millennials, such as changing her character’s response from “Yes” to “Yass” in an episode. “If we’re doing it right, both sides are making fun of both sides and learning something from each other,” Harris said.

* Gibbons previewed a few of The Great Indoors‘ upcoming episodes, including one about camping, one about finding Mintz-Plasse’s Clark a better living situation than the “microapartment” in which he dwells, and one about getting McHale’s Jack into the modern dating scene.

The Great Indoors premieres Thursday, Oct. 27, at 8:30/7:30c. 

Comments are monitored, so don’t go off topic, don’t frakkin’ curse and don’t bore us with how much your coworker’s sister-in-law makes per hour. Talk smart about TV!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

10 Comments
  1. Kevin K says:

    I’ll give Great Indoors a try even if the sitcom should give a big boost for a Big Bang lead-in. The cast is hilarious not only Joel McHale but McLovin from Superbad.

  2. David4 says:

    Stephen Fry is too good for American sitcoms.

  3. Shaun says:

    Yass,so excited!

  4. JB says:

    Can’t wait for this show!!! It looks hilarious and that cast is amazing!

  5. Lauren says:

    How did I miss that Stephen Fry is on this show? Yes! (Or I guess I mean yass since I’m a millennial.)

  6. Joey Padron says:

    Looking forward to see Joel’s new show.

  7. xsikal says:

    “Millennials saying it’s offensive to millennials plays into what we’re talking about,” Brown said, laughing.

    Glad someone on the panel was willing to point this out! :)

  8. DJ Doena says:

    Isn’t the basic promise a lot like Tim Allen’s “Last Man Standing”? Outdoor Man and all?