Post Mortems
Person of Interest Reese Dies

Person of Interest Bosses Spill Series Finale Secrets, Including Cut 'Reunion' Scene and Spinoff (?) Seeds

The following contains major spoilers from the Person of Interest series finale. If you read on before watching the episode, Samaritan will replace all your bookmarks with Kardashian Instagram pages.

As CBS’ Person of Interest came to an end on Tuesday night, Team Machine suffered one final loss, while another key player came back from the dead to fight another day. Someday…?

After saving Reese and Fusco (played by Jim Caveizel and Kevin Chapman) from a dockside execution at the hands of some dirty cops, Finch (Michael Emerson) set out to destroy the surviving copy of Samaritan, which was stored in an air gap inside a gold vault. Shaw (Sarah Shahi) meanwhile adjusted to having in her ear The Machine’s new voice, which delivered a final message from Root (Amy Acker) — that if Sameen were a “shape,” she was an “arrow.”

When Samaritan’s copy “escaped” the gold vault to make a beeline for a satellite dish that would transmit its code up into the sky to do who god-knows-what kind of damage, Harold locked John inside the chamber, prepared to make the final sacrifice by directing a hijacked missile to said rooftop satellite dish — dooming himself in the process.

John, though, had long ago made a “previous arrangement” with The Machine. As such, Harold was directed to the wrong rooftop while his partner in crimestopping put himself in the missile’s path. Once the dust settled, John had perished while Harold survived a gunshot wound to reunite with Grace in Paris. Both Fusco, who recouped from his stabbing, and Shaw stayed put in New York — with the latter negotiating custody of Bear, after coldly taking out Root’s killer but before answering a call from a random pay phone….

For one final time, POI co-showrunners Jonah Nolan and Greg Plageman answered TVLine’s burning questions, about the finale’s death toll, returns that didn’t come to be, cut scenes and planted “spinoff” seeds.

TVLINE | In your mind, was there ever a different combination of characters that didn’t make it out of the series alive? Were there any constants, as in, “Yes, this person will live”?person-of-interest-series-finale-reese
JONAH NOLAN |
What do you say, Greg? Reese always had a bullet with his name on it, right?
GREG PLAGEMAN | Yeah…. We talked about every permutation, and this one felt the most poetic, in terms of what Reese was initially hired to do, and him understanding that this was what it would come down to, what he’d have to do to save Harold Finch.

TVLINE He came into it as a soldier, and he went out a soldier.
PLAGEMAN | Yeah. Yeah.
NOLAN | I think in the pilot there was the sense that’s where he was headed. By the time you get a 103 episodes in, you don’t want to be beholden or “locked” into something, but this felt right when we talked about it whenever we talked about it, and it felt right when we sat down to write this one.

TVLINE | Can I just say how much I enjoyed the scene between Finch and Reese, where Harold expressed how surprised he was by the friendship that was born out of their partnership?
NOLAN | Aww, thank you. Look, the show has always had a sort of… cerebral appeal. Emotions dont come very easily to me [Plageman laughs], and we felt like with the finale it was more about emotional closure than “Look at the clever s–t we’re doing!”

TVLINE | Was the Ice-9 virus always a part of your end game? Because some have remarked, “Isn’t this something Harold might have mentioned sooner?”
NOLAN | There were a few mentions of it over the years — not exactly Ice-9, but the idea of it. In fact, going back to Reese’s training officer [Kara Stanton], played by Annie Parisse, she was trying to get her hands on something just like Ice-9 several seasons ago. The idea of a “doomsday” virus is something we’ve talked about, but the problem of course is that if you deploy it, you destroy The Machine. That’s why it was a long-haul decision. It was the “nuclear” option, doing  damage to the global economy, etcetera…. things the world could recover from, but it’s a lethal event for this version of The Machine.

TVLINE | Aside from, as you previously told me, not getting to have Elias be a part of the team for as long as you would have liked, is there anything on your list that you simply couldn’t get to this season? Any moment, any sequence, any conversation, any goodbye…?
NOLAN | There are certainly characters we would have liked to revisit again in flashback. In Episode 12, there were a number of different characters who’d come and gone on the show, who we would like to see one more time. Michael Kelly (as CIA agent Mark Snow) and Annie Parisse, obviously. They’re fantastic….
PLAGEMAN | We had written some scenes for them, didn’t we? I think we did but we cut them because we just ran out of room.
NOLAN | But in terms of goodbyes, everyone who is still alive in the present day, I think we tied up all those knots. It would have been nice to get to Control (played by Camryn Manheim), it would have been nice to get Paige Turco’s Zoe back on…. And for me, look, I would have liked to have had more time with FinchPerson of Interest Season 5 Preview in this darker, more dangerous place. And I would have loved to have had more time with Shaw and Root, obviously. But with the vagaries of Sarah’s schedule as a mom and the reduced [episode] order… it is what it is.

TVLINE | I was going to ask about Control, if you ever considered her fate in flux or if she was decidedly taken away to be killed in the previous finale.
PLAGEMAN | I like for the audience to fill in that blank themselves.
NOLAN | That was definitely a storyline we hoped to revisit. Camryn Manheim is a spectacular actor and we had so much fun working with her. That was one of the places where we were like, “OK, we’ve got a version of closure there, and we’ve got limited real estate,” so we’ve got to concentrate on [open] storylines. There were so many things we wanted to get to, but with the limit from the network in terms of not being able to do a full-tilt serialized season…. I’m very proud and very relieved at what this incredible writing staff, led by Greg and Denise [The], was able to pull off this season. We covered a lot of territory. There are so many fun ideas in this show, and so many fun things we want to play with, and we’ll have other outlets for that.

TVLINE | Well, between introducing the D.C team of Logan, Joey and Harper, and that final tag of Shaw getting the pay phone call, was either an “escape” clause, a seed to plant in case anyone ever says, “Hey, let’s bring POI back”?
PLAGEMAN | [Laughs] Never say never. I think the premise that Jonah came up with for this show was so bullet-proof in terms of being able to come back and see if an artificial super-intelligence re-emerged… But in terms of those particular scenes, the fun of meeting the other team in D.C. was also an attempt to address one of the ongoing questions of the show. We could now imagine that perhaps The Machine has other operatives person-of-interest-series-finale-shawaround the world.

TVLINE | If there was a thought bubble above Shaw’s head when she is smiling up at the surveillance camera at the end, what would it say?
NOLAN | I think [the smile] is much about hearing Root’s voice [on the phone]. And one of the few regrets I have about the way the finale cuts together is that’s not totally clear. We had a moment between them at the end, dialogue in that moment with Sarah on the phone, and it just didn’t “fit.” At that point, “the train was running,” the main score was going, and it felt like it stepped on the moment. But the clear implication is that that relationship continues in this new form — and that the franchise continues. It felt to us not like a naked attempt to try to build a spinoff.
    There could easily have been a conversation about a spinoff in Season 2, with the show riding high and Sarah Shahi’s character making such a splashy debut, but Greg and I weren’t interested in that. We were interested in doing one great show. We wanted everything to echo within the show itself, so in that moment at the end, the idea is just that The Machine keeps going, the mission keeps going. Shaw is like Reese, there’s the sense that this mission has given them meaning in their lives. And she leaves with a relationship with a dog and a god. [Laughs]
PLAGEMAN | Which are anagrams!

“Everyone dies alone. But if you mean something to someone…
if you help someone or love someone, and even a single person
remembers you… then maybe you never really die at all?”

Want more scoop on POI‘s finale, or for any other show? Email insideline@tvline.com and your question may be answered via Matt’s Inside Line.


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147 Comments
  1. Laura says:

    I feel like this was as good as the finale could be, given the constraints they had and the shortened episode order. It was clean and to-the-point and it didn’t try to be too grandiose with it. I’ve seen shows do much worse with more time.

    • Jim says:

      It ended the way I thought it would, which means it paid off the narrative and character arcs in their logical and most satisfying ways. Great finale. John was never going to live, we knew that from episode 1. The machine was going to survive, because there will be other artificial super intelligences eventually and this one will be their guide as they develop so they hopefully don’t destroy humanity. Its training and development were mostly what the show turned out to be about. Shaw was going to live, because that’s what she does, always moving forward. Finch was going to live because he needs to see the fruits of his handiwork, his child become an adult, and Grace is just a bonus. Fusco could have gone either way, but it felt more right that he live and take John’s place, he’s earned it. So yeah.

      • eddie willers says:

        Yes. My feeling was that The Machine would be looking for whatever ASI replaced Samaritan and intervene if it had to. And continue Finch’s mission of looking out for the irrelevants.

    • Fluffy says:

      Pound Puppiez

  2. Rob Horine says:

    When Finch was looking at Grace, I was screaming at the tv. “TALK TO HER FINCH! DAMN YOU JUST TALK TO HER!” That scene was the payoff. Great series.

    And I thought the writers would use a “St. Elsewhere” ending.

  3. MangoMagic says:

    Never cried for a series finale before but man, this one got me good. John and Shaw were my favorite characters and this ending…well, needless to say, I’m pretty “shook” right now as my siblings say. POI may have had its flaws, some excusable, others downright infuriating, but this finale was just about as close to perfect as you can get. Everything from the RootMachine to Shaw’s showdown with the guy who killed Root and nearly killed Fusco was simply amazing. I never really bought into the Root/Shaw relationship until that comment RootMachine made about Shaw being an arrow. That’s when the waterworks started. Shaw’s eyes got all misty and I just started bawling. I kinda wish they’d shown a little bit of Carter or at least her son in this episode.

    • Rob Horine says:

      Is it me or that talk between RootMachine/Shaw seemed like Wesley/Fred(Illirya) from the final episode of Angel?

      • Ronda says:

        Yes! I loved the symmetry of those moments.

      • MangoMagic says:

        You’re determined to make me bawl my eyes out all night aren’t you? Amy Acker’s voice is one of two things for me. Either smugly annoying or poignantly soothing. Tonight she served up the latter. Her as RootMachine was pretty much the best thing the creators ever did; made me wish they’d done it sooner even while Root was alive maybe? IDK. I’m too busy crying because you just had to bring up Fred/Wesley!!

      • Rick Katze says:

        Good catch. I missed that.

      • Sam says:

        Killing Root just to make her the machine’s voice was a joke ! worst season ever

    • Kiran Das says:

      I cried too but for John. His sacrifice, finally sealed the fate of the Samaritan and Machine. Also, how Machine held her hand upon John’s shoulders, although virtually, erupted emotions in me. I have never cried for any show, even longer ones with 8 to 10 years running length. But, this phenomenal ending made me understand many things and keep this ending in my memories for years to come.

      • Lois says:

        I think that the reason the emotions were so on the surface for me and this whole 5th season is because the show did not feel like it had stories that were past their prime. Everything felt new and fresh and journeyed toward a major payback. This is the way that Series Finales need to be constructed. Take note the creators of another show that left this year, “The Good Wife”. Opposite ends of the spectrum.

        • GG says:

          i agree, how could a show end..when it was so freaking good…I can’t believe its over..and yes..emotions were high when i watched the finale…”John was da MAN”.
          and Shaw was the best and sexy at what she did.

  4. Alicia Gray says:

    “Harold Finch: Sooner or later both of us will probably wind up dead.” – 1×01

  5. Morgan says:

    “And I would have loved to have had more time with Shaw and Root, obviously.”
    Really?! You fooled me. You spent more time on Harold’s man pain and glossed over Shaw’s return.

    • Olivia says:

      He survived AND got his fiancée back. I don’t know which one is the most infuriating to me right now. Root died and Shaw and her never got the slightest “I love you” before or even a “she loved you” from The Machine. Hell, Shaw didn’t show grief all the while we got to witness the guys are almost making declarations of love to one another several times in this ep alone because not everybody will make it out alive etc. I mean… Lol, the double standards awards have another serious contender.
      Sad to see John kicking the bucket but it was predictable from the very beginning. Glad that Shaw got Bear and a “purpose”. Pretty indifferent to Fusco’s fate because I wanted to see everyone bite it but at the same time the poor guy earned his redemption. The killing of Blackwell was pretty underwhelming to me but oh well, Shaw killed him so there’s that. I almost thought they would spare the dude’s life to make some grandiose paternalistic point.
      No seriously, I’m pretty annoyed than Harold “don’t kill the congressman even if it will allow Samaritan to come online, wreak havoc, get innocents, Root and Reese killed” Finch got to not only survive but also reunite with his fiancée. WTH.

      • MangoMagic says:

        Perhaps you missed the entire point of Shaw’s character. It’s been very well established that Shaw doesn’t experience emotions the way, John or Fusco or Finch do. She wasn’t with Root for the blatant, verbal “I love you’s”, they were together because Root was willing and joyfully accepted Shaw as she was: a beautiful arrow. That was the beauty of their love. Also Shaw did grieve; in her own way. When RootMachine delivered Root’s final message, I’m 100% Shaw teared up. That’s a legitimate first. If THAT isn’t grieving for someone who barely batted an eyelash in the car crash that claimed her parents life then yeah, I think you missed the entire point of Shaw’s character. But that’s just me.

        • Olivia says:

          Oh, I didn’t disregard the very dna of her character. But you however seem to have missed the point of my comment which was the double standard.

          • MangoMagic says:

            I didn’t miss it. I just don’t agree that there was a double standard. Fusco/Reese/Finch have a dynamic where normally they won’t say “I love you” and “you’re my best friend” unless they are in a life or death situation and even then its grudgingly or jokingly delivered. Unlike Shaw they’re not emotionally disconnected, so to speak. When backed against the wall, they are willing to share those kind of blatant sentimentalities. Shaw/Root on the other hand don’t operate in that way, IMO. For example, the episode when Root died; I don’t recall the exact details but she went off on this long crazy tangent and I remember Shaw asking with a smile if that was her way of flirting or saying she cared or something to that affect. In that moment, with either of them liable to die at any second Root’s crazy tangent (man now I really want to rewatch that episode!) while her and Shaw were trapped in a shootout was their “I love you/you’re my best friend”.

            Ultimately, my point is that the way the guys shared their goodbyes doesn’t have to be the way the girls shared their goodbyes and that’s what made each of them and their relationships special to me.

          • Olivia says:

            And you missed the point again. Well, not completely because I did start the “verbal” discussion. I do understand what you are saying (and you’re right in regards to characters specificity) but I still feel a glaring double standard. It depends on how you relate to the characters and what you’re getting out of your own representation I guess. Views are not the same depending from where you’re watching. However even if the ep was mute it would not change the fact that Finch and his decisions got Shaw captured/tortured and Root killed and for him the show ends with rewards of survival and getting to be reunited with Grace.
            The show was AMAZING. I enjoyed it tremendously but it doesn’t mean that I’m blind to everything. Out of 3 leading men, 2 survived, one of them getting a pretty happy ending all things considered. Out of 3 leading ladies, 2 died over the course of the show and the one survivor is the numb character, the one we never get to see “grieve” (you know, regardless of character peculiarity). We saw John reacting 100 times harder to Carter’s loss. Not saying his reaction was bad or unwarranted, before people interpret it that way. If you put a watermelon and an cherry on a scale it’s just a fact that one is heavier. It does not mean that one is bad, or rotten, or whatever. Just that it’s not equal in weight. That’s what I was trying to convey, that there is a glaring difference between the treatment of the 3 males and 3 females in the end, whether the characters are like this or like that and even if their demise makes sense in the story.
            Anyway, agree to disagree, like I said we can’t see the same things with different expectations. Good for people if they got what they hoped for out of the series finale!

        • Matthew Hieber says:

          John doesn’t cry. He’s a poor example to use towards your point. Shaw is Mr. Reese female counterpart. They even sound the same throughout the show. They both: are highly trained in combat, care about their friends, have lost people, exhibit little to no emotion, and talk in low register’s.

          Ever since the death of Jessica he’d been this way.
          John didn’t cry over his father in flashback from when he was a kid, or when Joss Carter died. He shut his mouth and drank his sorrows.

          The only difference between Shaw and John is that they were somewhat progressing in opposite directions. Shaw was slowly being humanized by her friends and John was finding out that his fate was ultimately sealed and he was learning how to be okay with the fact of the matter. That’s why he cut ties with his girlfriend of late.

          Now i’m not saying shaw is totally humanised right now, but she certainly has made progress in that direction.

          My end all be all point is that they did not capitalize on John after the explosion. They should have shown Finch in front of the grave stone before they showed him confronting his wife (that would’ve been an even better method of covering up his last name) and it would have reflected the quote about being cared about being read Rootmachine again. Or they should have shown John in Shaw’s reflection when she was walking down the street where the phone rang. John’s litteral last moment on screen was him getting massacred by samaratan grunts. He got assaulted by the people he’d always been able to stand up against and passed that BLOWN UP! THEY SHOULD HAVE HAD HIM FIGHT OFF ALL OF THEM AND THEN GET BLOWN UP BECAUSE THE WAY THEY LEFT IT: THERE WAS NO POINT FOR THE MISSILE JOHN WAS DEAD ALREADY REGARDLESS!!! (and yes i know the missile was sent to stop the upload not kill john.) Uggh whew anyway I loved the show a lot. Rip John Reese. In addition Root actually does share her feeling in times of hard ship she was just a weirdo, but a weirdo who cared. (In reply to your later comment)

  6. Ronda says:

    One of the best series finales since Angel. The team keeps fighting, keeps battling onwards.

  7. Kevin K says:

    I give it an A. What a way to end the series on a high note and I was in shock on how so many beloved characters would have face life or death situations ever since Carter’s demise in Season 3. Got me hooked since the very beginning and POI will go down as one of the most mind blowing, high octane and suspenseful series in recent memory.

  8. Adonnis says:

    Good finale, but it was a little disappointing given all they had set up. They went more on the emotional side rather than being a little darker and compelling. Nonetheless, good enough.

  9. Alicia Gray says:

    Maybe John is at the LOST church right now waiting for Ben/Finch on that bench to realize his life.

  10. John Corbae says:

    I am glad Finch found love. I am glad John went out a hero like his father. I am very glad Fusco lived because of his son. And Shaw just deserves a better life and hopefully Bear will be leading her there.

  11. LC says:

    I think they did the best they could given the shortened season. I’m just sad we will never REALLY know John and Harold’s REAL last names. Wish they would have at least showed Johns last name on his grave. But I’m glad he ended up buried exactly as her deserved, as a hero.

    • Kal Kutz says:

      What grave? Would he even have one? He was already believed to be dead and having a cruise missile land on top of you means there won’t be any real pieces to bury.

      • lou meyer says:

        There was a brief shot at the end of a head stone with the name John on it. Until that, I kept expecting him to show up. If anyone could have survived being shot multiple times and being on a building that blew up, it would have been him. I really enjoyed this show!

        • Jakub Kocian says:

          yeah Root and John can still lives.Root should make fake death cuz she was easy target in hospital.And john already survive more than 2 bullets + help with machine he could escape building with safer way).

  12. Joe V. says:

    I began reading sci-fi when I was 7, 59 years ago, and read 100 books some years.
    After teaching Julius Caesar to HS kids several times, I thought nothing could equal that play.
    The entire series, Person Of Interest, eclipses Star Trek, Star Wars, the underrated Eureka, The Twilight Zone, and every other sci-fi movie, novel or series I have ever read, and compares well with Shakespeare in my opinion.
    POI blended classic conflict with modern and future issues and did it brilliantly.

    • Rick Katze says:

      I would say that the first 4 seasons of Babylon 5 equaled POI.

      • i believe what he means is that shakespeare saw human interactions and society through the modern technology of that age (books were the iphone equivelant in shakespear also fireworks were happy birds at that time) with person of interest trying to predict how we will evolved as a society in the next couple of years (and this is why shakespear is relevant even today), babylon 5 which is a bloody brilliant show tries to see in 200 years which is more possible (jules verne did that) but with the “alien factor” which let’s face it we will never know ( from wikipedia “Syrian-Greek writer Lucian’s 2nd-century satire True History, which uses a voyage to outer space and conversations with alien life forms” 2000 years ago talked about aliens!)
        i will disagree with twilight zone cause there they only had one episode to tell incredible stories , person of interest lasted longer

      • BillyBobJohnson says:

        Leonard: You hate Babylon 5.

        Sheldon: I do. It fails as drama, science fiction, and it’s hopelessly derivative. But you like it, and you’re my friend.

    • spocko says:

      I don’t know who you are, or where you live, but it would be great to hang out with you, I agree with you assessment.

    • Stuart C. Hellinger says:

      Sometimes, the best science fiction is not overt science fiction. “Person of Interest” was one of the most brilliant examples. It was brilliantly subversive, well crafted and acted and made you think. It was a rare example of highly intelligent broadcast television. I ended up watching the final episode twice in a row, something I rarely, if ever, do.

      Thank you to everyone connected to the show from Jonathan Nolan, through the amazing cast and crew for a compelling, interesting 103 episodes.

  13. samaritan says:

    What an outstanding show. Too bad John had to die, but what a great way for him to go. I hate cbs for canceling the most complex show of all time. The series was amazing – thank you, Jonathan Nolan!

  14. niloofar says:

    Beautiful Ending

  15. Beth says:

    RIP Reese. That was the only part of the Finale that I didn’t like.

  16. peterwdawson says:

    Fairly decent series finale. Not my favorite but it worked pretty good all considered.

  17. A.D. says:

    This show was near perfection every season from start to finish and damn CBS for never giving it its due that it was deserved…smart…well-written…great acting…and a dammed fine story…Loved every minute and wish it had more…POI will be truly missed…but it meant something to someone and will never truly die…

  18. Charlie says:

    Great show and concept! Compelling storyline from the start and beautiful characters with a sense of duty and purpose.

  19. J Causey says:

    Been watching since the first show when John ‘cleaned up’ the subway fight…. Sorry to see the show end with his death! Will not watch a new episode….would never be the same. 007 lived on, and on, and on, but this would not survive a remake!

    • PatriciaLee says:

      I feel with you, but Jim Caviezel IS a movie star–loved him in Frequency and Count of MC–and could have a solid film career ahead of him. I could go along with another wounded soul getting “another chance” in the future.

      • Steve says:

        Patricia – I agree – Jim Caviezel is a movie star, I can not believe he did a tv series for 5 years. I thank him. If you ever read any of Clive Cussler’s novels, his main character, Dirk Pitt, is John ( Jim Caviezel). I always hate it when the star dies in a series, I wish that did not happen, I guess they figured he would never do another show. Last week when Greer killed himself, kinda bothered me as far as writing it, because a sicko sociopath would never kill himself. At any rate, great series, thanks.

        • Scullycat says:

          Steve- that’s so funny that you picture Caviezel as Dirk Pitt. I also now picture him when I read the Jack Reacher books by Lee Child.

  20. P Flint says:

    Would like it to come back.

  21. Lola Walker says:

    This was my favorite show and will truly miss my POI…

  22. 134sc says:

    One question: the tombstones at the end…were they implying that John was buried next to his father? Or was that somebody else’s grave. I found it odd that the pan lingered on the tomb next to John’s and then quickly cut away as it was passing John’s.

    All in all though, great finale. Would have loved to have seen a yellow box, with the “primary asset” designation around Shaw at the end, but I guess a nod and a smile to the security camera was enough

    • PatriciaLee says:

      Wasn’t the graveyard scene with little John, his defining moment of his life, when they were talking about how brave his father had been in saving four people? Or did I get that repeated graveyard scene wrong? Perhaps the machine was giving a last look at that defining moment by that camera shot at the father’s tombstone?

    • Bear the Dog says:

      The tombstone next to John’s had a birthday in 1983 or so, so that person was way too young to be John’s father. I thought that panning was weird too, but they just didn’t want to show us his real last name.

  23. Bozo says:

    Great ending to on of the great shows of all time. As if the story itself wasn’t enough to make me tear up, by the end I almost lost it because of how good it was and how much I am going to miss new episodes of the show.

  24. Pam says:

    I love Person of Interest and want it to keep going but it might be difficult without John or maybe he can be a second voice of the machine. This episode was so emotional insides was in knotts
    I love the show

  25. Another Poster says:

    It stinks that this outstanding program was treated so badly by CBS, since they did not own it and only broke even when they aired it, according to Les Moonves.
    One of the best ever series finales of all time, and it deserves to be nominated for many Emmys.

  26. Pam says:

    I love Person of Interest and want it to keep going but it might be difficult without John or maybe he can be a second voice of the machine. This episode was so emotional my insides were in knotts. Everyone in my house knows Tuesday night at 10:00pm the TV is mine
    I love the show.

  27. Name (Required) says:

    “The following contains major spoilers from the Person of Interest series finale” – DOH, the freaking url to this page gives a spoiler

    • Normandy says:

      That’s done on purpose. So is seeing a brief spoiler-heavy summary if you do a search on a television show and get TV Line as the top link. They don’t care if you get spoiled. They want the clicks that result from spoiling people. Clicks are everything for websites and they will do whatever it takes to get them.

    • Lexi says:

      CBS adios. The last of the great shows is now gone and so am I.

  28. Steve Greer says:

    Really didn’t want Reese to die.

  29. that finale was “an arrow”

  30. nichollspete says:

    While I would have prefered the final season had taken more time wirh things, I am pretty pleased with the final season and the finale. I find it amusing that POI is going off just as Mr. Robot is returning. I feel like the two shows could take place in the same story universe. Mr. Robot is like POI if it were darker, not an action show, and had a smaller budget. I’d love to see Finch, Shaw, or Fusco show up on season 3 of Mr. Robot. OK, it’s late. Time wipe the tears from my eyes and try to get some sleep.

  31. POI_Fan_Forever says:

    A great finale. It all made sense. It was pretty much as it was destined to be. RIP John, you whisper-voiced, hard-hitting hunk of save-the-day kinda guy. Was great seeing you going out with guns blasting saving your friends and the entire world. Fusco’s become a man his son can be proud of. I agree with the EPs that it would have been so great to have had more time with Root and Sameen (for them and for us). The two of them having such a short time together makes me tear up. So glad the last thing I heard was Root’s voice and the smile it brought to Sameen’s face. I like that she’s carrying on the job of saving people and being Bear’s mom so she doesn’t have to be alone. I can only hope there’s a spinoff and we get to see her occasionally. I love the banter between her and Fusco and I’d love to see that again. that’d be awesome. Happy to see the Machine’s little squares around the heads of the people walking down the street oblivious to how close they came to “1984” of sorts. (Now if someone could just save us from the same fate.) Wonderful that Finch found Grace and how her face lit up with love and joy at seeing him again (I’ll follow Carrie Preston anywhere!). I love that Finch collected this motley crew of loners on a bad path and reminded them all what good people they truly are. That’s a legacy to be proud of. To Mr. Nolan and Mr. Plageman – thank you so much for an amazing show that ended too soon, but ended with integrity.

  32. Eric H says:

    Really going to miss this show as I’ve really grown to like each and every one of the characters. With the limited time and episodes they had to wrap up this season and series, I think they did about as well as they could have. Don’t know if I’ll ever get so emotionally attached to another network show since it just seems they get ripped away too soon.

  33. PatriciaLee says:

    The husband says, “It was kind of bleak with Reese gone. He was the main star.” I thought his going had class.

  34. hank ronson says:

    long live team machine and the mayhem twins

  35. LOUIS PLOCH says:

    I believe the writers of this show went far beyond what you normally derive from a TV series. The characters were finally united, more as a family than a regimented military team. The ending was an emotional experience with spiritual connotations that should impress every viewer to look beyond the everyday humdrum of what life is all about. GREAT JOB !

  36. Meshell says:

    Series finales are rarely this well rounded. Beautifully done!

  37. Sandra cooper says:

    Love the show. Wish it could go on. It was really interesting loved John &Finch. Job well done. Miss you all.

  38. Jake says:

    Read through most of the comments here and there are a lot of great points being made about the show. One thing I always wanted to note was that it was Sci-Fi (or maybe Sci Fact in a few years time) and not some pseudo cop show about saving people who’s numbers the machine send them.
    Probably the last show who had a finale as good as this was Fringe, and in way the shows remind me of each other, about saving the world from technology gone bad.

    • Kiran Das says:

      I also liked Fringe. On the Scientific side, it was more thorough but it was less engaging then POI. I was sad the day, Fringe ended but I was never emotionally hiked up like today

      • Doug Henning says:

        That’s because Fringe’s final season was weird… POI in its final season still had the numbers of people to save along with the final endgame of the show

  39. kirads09 says:

    Reese. :’-( I sobbed. That was an amazing way to go out, POI. My favorite line of the night (paraphrasing) When Finch tells the Fed guard he has a bomb. Reese “I like this new side of you Harold. It’s terrifying, but I like it.” Classic. My only qualm is that they found a way for everyone else to survive (even the Machine) why not Reese. But I guess it had to go that way.

  40. Renae Aln says:

    Really upset that my favorite show came to an end.Amazing cast and writers.Upset with CBS for making us wait so long for final season

  41. Vijay says:

    Everything was great, the casting, the story, the actors, the writing, the action, thrills and beyond all the iconic “Machine” music by Ramin Djawadi. This show has created a precedent in setting and taking the A.I genre in a league of its own. I just wished that they should not have ended the show so dramatically after 5 superb seasons. Thank you John Nolan for giving us this peach of a show.

  42. Sissy says:

    Great Finale! Thank you to all the writers, producers, actors, and staff that made this series possible. Although I was not surprised that John took the bullet(s) for Harold, it was a very tragic ending. I loved all the one-liners throughout the entire series. Ok, so I teared up when Shaw took Bear. So relieved he was safe! Weird thing I noticed: when Shaw heard Root’s voice as the Machine, did she say “Amy?” Was Root’s name also Amy? I can’t remember that detail. And finally Harold and Grace reunited. Sigh. Lovely. Let’s hear it for our Macon Home Girl! Carrie Preston! Woo HOOOOOO!

  43. SMILEY FACE says:

    After watching and loving Person of Interest with John Reese busting kneecaps, I dont think I want to watch James Bond anymore unless Jim Caviezel is the next James Bond. Just saying. He would no doubt kill it. Anyone would like to disagree?

  44. Tremay Dobson says:

    I found the whole series to be fantastic. The characters were very good, then in came Shaw and oh my goodness, shaw is a welcome addition, very good actress. As far as I’m concerned shaw should have her own series.

    • Until made ‘gay’, Shaw was dynamite. Seeing her walk with her dog in New York City
      screamed “The Shaw Show” right at me. A very effective and attractive Actress is she.

      • Kal Kutz says:

        @chillboots, I don’t really think of Shaw as “gay” myself. I never really saw her as a lesbian, just somebody who found another person that she connected with. That person just so happened to be another woman but it didn’t need to be

  45. Chili Boots says:

    Nolan’s ‘urge’: “I would have loved to have had more time with Shaw and Root” is
    EXACTLY what killed this Show. Unnecessary Propaganda, and squirm-worthy at
    that, writing ‘Lesbian’ onto those two attractive characters was, what should be, a
    career-ending self-indulgence. He personally destroyed this Show, by cutting the
    “Interest” into less-than-half. ‘Smash’ has taught these arrogant clowns nothing; they
    continue to hawk those same wares, ubiquitously, with every opportunity they get.

    Congratulations: you’ve alienated 90% of your audience. Surprised? You shouldn’t be.

    Very few of us are Gay.

    • Matt Webb Mitovich says:

      (“Smash”?)

    • Matthew says:

      John doesn’t cry. He’s a poor example to use towards your point. Shaw is Mr. Reese female counterpart. They even sound the same throughout the show. They both: are highly trained in combat, care about their friends, have lost people, exhibit little to no emotion, and talk in low register’s.

      Ever since the death of Jessica he’d been this way.
      John didn’t cry over his father in flashback from when he was a kid, or when Joss Carter died. He shut his mouth and drank his sorrows.

      The only difference between Shaw and John is that they were somewhat progressing in opposite directions. Shaw was slowly being humanized by her friends and John was finding out that his fate was ultimately sealed and he was learning how to be okay with the fact of the matter. That’s why he cut ties with his girlfriend of late.

      Now i’m not saying shaw is totally humanised right now, but she certainly has made progress in that direction.

      My end all be all point is that they did not capitalize on John after the explosion. They should have shown Finch in front of the grave stone before they showed him confronting his wife (that would’ve been an even better method of covering up his last name) and it would have reflected the quote about being cared about being read Rootmachine again. Or they should have shown John in Shaw’s reflection when she was walking down the street where the phone rang. John’s litteral last moment on screen was him getting massacred by samaratan grunts. He got assaulted by the people he’d always been able to stand up against and passed that BLOWN UP! THEY SHOULD HAVE HAD HIM FIGHT OFF ALL OF THEM AND THEN GET BLOWN UP BECAUSE THE WAY THEY LEFT IT: THERE WAS NO POINT FOR THE MISSILE JOHN WAS DEAD ALREADY REGARDLESS!!! (and yes i know the missile was sent to stop the upload not kill john.) Uggh whew anyway I loved the show a lot. Rip John Reese. In addition Root actually does share her feeling in times of hard ship she was just a weirdo, but a weirdo who cared. (In reply to your later comment) Although I agree with a ton of what you said. Your comment that “very few of us are gay” is true don’t get me wrong. But unfortunately his inclusion of this storyline was more likely an attempt to boost ratings on the final season of the show. They didn’t pursue that really until now. The single kiss from season 4 wasnt enough to say “They’re lesbians.” It was free to the viewers to decide what it meant. 2016 is here and the minority is really quite the opposite of what many believe. More people than ever before are gobbling up this “love won gay rights” stuff its the most talked about “political” topic other than “Donald Trump is a nazi” point being don’t attack Johnathen Nolan for making a decision that could have possibly boosted the popularity of his Insanely underrated show. He just wanted to capture the attention of potential viewers. Other than that 100% agree with your comment.

  46. Alex says:

    One of best network shows EVER and they had me from EP 1, season 1.
    They could have found a way to get Reese out of that fix, he’s been in worse. I won’t watch a remake/upgrade if they do because he won’t be in it.

  47. KLS says:

    Excellent finale. I loved how they incorporated Amy Acker (The Machine) and not just her voce throughout this episode. Will miss the show. One of the few that got the “tech” right throughout.

  48. tztypes says:

    I loved the finale, and I am so glad Bear made it through (I love Bear). There’s just one thing I didn’t understand. When the Machine is uploaded to the satellite to fight Samaritan, Finch observes that this is hopeless. Samaritan has defeated the Machine in every fight. The Machine relies that this time defeat isn’t an option. And the Machine wins. What is that? By what logic could that possibly have worked? It seemed like such a cop out to me, like here I was watching sci-fi, and now suddenly it’s a preschool cartoon where if you just believe hard enough you can do anything.

    • Kal Kutz says:

      I took it as that The Machine didn’t have to power to defend itself in those simulations against Samaritan. Once this happened it was a different Machine capable of much more than before.

    • Jake says:

      In a way, the Machine didn’t win – it got “killed” along with Samaritan. However, it was able to save a clean back up copy of itself that activated and installed after the computer virus ran it’s course. The Machine saved a copy of it’s “prime directive” on an analog tape machine (which would be unaffected by the virus) to give the clean installation of the new Machine it’s direction and purpose. All which is quite doable and not cartoonish.

  49. tztypes says:

    I loved the finale, and I am so glad Bear made it through (I love Bear). There’s just one thing I didn’t understand.

    When the Machine is uploaded to the satellite to fight Samaritan, Finch observes that this is hopeless. Samaritan has defeated the Machine in every fight. The Machine relies that this time defeat isn’t an option. And then the Machine wins.

    What happened? By what logic could that possibly have worked? It seemed like such a cop out to me, like here I was watching sci-fi, and now suddenly it’s a preschool cartoon where if you just believe hard enough anything can happen. I mean, I was very relieved that it survived, but it just didn’t make sense.