Supernatural Season 11 Spoilers

Supernatural's Richard Speight, Jr. on the Show's Wackiest Episode Yet

Supernatural has crafted a universe where fairies attack and Dorothy of Oz exists, but this may be the show’s wackiest scenario yet: Sam’s childhood imaginary friend isn’t all that imaginary — and he needs the Winchesters’ help!

In tonight’s episode (The CW, 9/8c), the aforementioned pal, Sully (played by Mr. Sunshine‘s Nate Torrence), seeks out Sam and Dean when things get bloody in his world. Off screen, there was a returning friend involved in the action as well: the installment marks the TV directorial debut of actor Richard Speight, Jr., who recurs as the angel Gabriel/The Trickster on the hit series.

In what should be a treat for longtime fans, the hour promises to deliver some significant insights into Sammy’s upbringing, like “why Sully mattered to him [and] why Sam needed an imaginary friend” at the time, Speight, Jr. previews, adding that viewers will discover “what was going on in the family dynamic that was making a young boy lean away from existing family.”

In the episode’s flashbacks, Sam — portrayed for the first time by Dylan Kingwell (The Returned) — is “struggling to find his own identity as a little boy,” Speight, Jr. continues. “There’s something very sweet and telling about it. It speaks a lot to who Sam is now, the choices that he now makes and has made in the past.”

Although there’s a lot of “gravitas” to Sully’s return and “really grounded, legitimate heartfelt moments” between the old buds, the hour is also filled with plenty of levity befitting the unusual premise.

“It’s got a lot of the fun, quirky, untraditional comedic elements that Supernatural sometimes gets into,” Speight, Jr. says. “We definitely have some fun characters coming back and bringing a different kind of quirky energy to the show.”

Supernatural Season 11 SpoilersBut the action behind the camera was all business. Believe it or not, stars and notorious jokesters Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki did not pull any pranks on Speight, Jr. (Someone got lucky, unlike co-star Misha Collins when he first directed!)

“There was a moment where Jared looked at me and said, ‘I really feel like I should be screwing with you because so many people have asked me to,'” Speight, Jr. shares. “And I recall saying something like, ‘Let’s disappoint them, shall we?'”

As for whether Speight, Jr. – who honed his craft by helming the short film America 101 as well as enrolling in the Warner Bros. Television Directors’ Workshop – will ever grace the CW drama again on screen, “That’s the question, isn’t it?” the actor replies. “The people who watch the show religiously know that Gabriel’s back. When he reappeared to Castiel [in Season 9’s ‘Meta Fiction’], he made that clear. So he’s somewhere, doing something, watching this whole Darkness thing play out. And I, like everybody else, look forward to seeing how and when he decides…what he’s going to do about it.”

Comments are monitored, so don’t go off topic, don’t frakkin’ curse and don’t bore us with how much your coworker’s sister-in-law makes per hour. Talk smart about TV!

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19 Comments
  1. Pat says:

    I love Supernaturel and this episode looks very interesting with lots of fun mixed into it. I am just waiting for the time to come when Sam and Dean will be crossing over to either Flash or Arrow or maybe even both since these two seem to know how to deal with the bizarre and crazy.

  2. From what the boys have said, it’s supposed to be a funny episode. I truly hope the writers have actually *watched* the show before and don’t throw young Dean under the bus where taking care of young Sam is concerned. It’s been well established in canon that Dean always looked out for his brother. They’ve done enough sanctifying of Sam this season without adding raising himself to the mix.

    • Rob Watkins says:

      The show has also done it’s fair share of throwing dirt on Sam.

      • Joe says:

        Has the show done that, or just rabid fangirls, though? A lot of the criticism that I’ve seen has come down to bickering fangirls who prefer one brother over the other one. Even when something is explained in universe it gets wanked on to death by shippers and stans who heap all the blame onto the other brother because they have to cling to the ideal that their fave is perfect.

        • Tina says:

          While I will agree that most of the mud thrown at Sam comes from blind haters, show has helped a lot in giving them reasons. Season 8 is a very good example. While for most fans Sam was simply written OOC, for haters he just proved how bad of a brother he is.
          I don’t think we have to worry about Dean getting thrown under the bus if the writers follow what we already know. Sam has always been trying to get away from hunting life and John, not Dean.

          • Speaking only for myself, I’m not a Sam-hater by any stretch, but I just don’t like where the writers are going with him (not quite S8 levels, but they are on their way). The key part of your sentence is ‘if the writers follow what we already know’. That’s all I want – for them to stick with the canon already in place – that Dean was a good big brother to Sam. Totally agree that his issues were with John and hunting.

    • Becky says:

      Except for that time when Dean left Sam asleep to go play pinball or something and a Shtriga almost killed him before John arrived and it got away.

      • Erin says:

        Or when he dropped him off at a pizza place to meet girls. Or when he and John went off to fight monsters and left Sam behind to do research. I think Dean certainly did the best he could under the circumstances, but that doesn’t mean that Sam had this great childhood while Dean suffered and sacrificed.

    • Alana says:

      I agree.

      They are totally throwing Dean under the bus, however, if we remember what we know from Canon about Dean being there for Sam, watching out for him, raising him, always there for him, like you said. Sam suddenly needing an imaginary friend to reach for help, guide and even giving HIM credit to who he is now… Make me very uneasy (and unhappy) regarding this episode.

  3. Dawn Howland says:

    yeah but even under the best of circumstances a brother whose only four years older and a distant/absentee father probably neglected at least some of Sam’s emotional needs… so imaginary friend to fill in the gaps.

  4. Joseph Balaich says:

    What if the Trickster is bringing Sam’s and everyone’s imaginary friend to life?

  5. ? says:

    That season 9 episode absolutely did NOT make it clear he was alive and back. But I’m glad he is! Tricked Lucifer himself, eh?

    • Joe says:

      I found that comment odd, too. As far as I’m concerned he was an illusion created by Metatron. I’d like to think if Gabriel was really alive he wouldn’t have hung everyone out to dry for all this time.

  6. bluesfan473 says:

    The Trickster is one of my favorite peripheral characters,, I hope he will appear on screen again soon!

  7. beaniesandbracelets says:

    Anyone who thinks that this is the wackiest episode has either not seen or has forgotten episodes The French Mistake, Monster Movie, and Changing Channels.

  8. That’s a pretty tall order for this episode to fill… “whackiest”! Since Carver said “bittersweet”, I’m going to say “outlandish” might fit the bill better. Have to wait to see the episode to see what’s the best description. Counting the hours….

  9. I wasn’t convinced that really was Gabriel that appeared to Castiel. He seemed off and something just wasn’t right there. Figured it was Metatron impersonating him. I would love Gabriel back, but it seems like it would be hard to explain his prolonged absence at this point.