Throwback Thursday

SNL Flashback: Watch Bobby Moynihan in His First 'Drunk Uncle' Sketch

As we prepare to say goodbye to Bobby Moynihan on Saturday Night Live, how about one last toast to Drunk Uncle?

Moynihan wraps up his nine-season SNL run this Saturday, and the news made us all misty-eyed and sentimental about his Drunk Uncle character. (Well, it was either that, or the three glasses of whiskey.) Drunk Uncle — a frequent Weekend Update commentator and cranky old guy who railed against things he didn’t really understand, all while completely sloshed — was a staple of Moynihan’s, and probably his most lasting contribution to SNL lore.

So we’re taking a look back at Drunk Uncle’s very first appearance, in December 2011, with anchor Seth Meyers asking him for his thoughts on the holiday season. Drunk Uncle waxes nostalgic for the good ol’ days: “You can’t even say ‘Merry Christmas’ anymore! You gotta say, ‘Hey, baby Jesus, you wanna do Pilates?'” He’s also not thrilled that his niece is “getting gay-married” and has plenty of dad jokes about then-current trends: “Occupy Lame Street!”

He does admit to liking one thing about Christmas, though: “That sexy green M&M lady… I would hit that.”

Press PLAY on the video above to watch Drunk Uncle’s debut, then hit the comments to share your favorite Bobby Moynihan memories.

Comments are monitored, so don’t go off topic, don’t frakkin’ curse and don’t bore us with how much your coworker’s sister-in-law makes per hour. Talk smart about TV!

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2 Comments
  1. Van says:

    Not funny, never was

    • Patrick says:

      It was OK. Like a lot of SNL bits, it was too long, and repeated too often. Even great recurring characters might not be as good as Church Lady or Wayne and Garth. SNL can kill characters by using them too much.