Making a Murderer Controversy

Making a Murderer EPs on Omitting Evidence: It Wasn't 'Significant'

The team behind Netflix’s Making a Murderer is responding to criticism that they left out key information in an effort to preserve the narrative that Steven Avery was framed.

“We’re documentary filmmakers, we’re not prosecutors. We’re not defense attorneys,” executive producer/director Laura Ricciardi said Sunday at the Television Critics Association winter press tour in Pasadena. “We did not set out to convict or exonerate anyone. We set out to examine the justice system and how it’s functioning today.”

Ricciardi admitted that, “of course, we left out evidence” because “there would have been no other way” to complete the project.

“It just would have been impossible for us to include every piece of evidence that was submitted to the court or attempted to be submitted to the court,” Ricciardi explained. “So we took our cues from the prosecution, what they thought was the most compelling evidence, that’s what we included.”

“We were not putting on a trial, but a film,” she continued. “Of what was omitted, was that really significant? The answer is no.”

In the four weeks since the documentary’s debut, “we’ve had several telephone conversations with Stephen Avery,” Ricciardi revealed. “We did record those calls with an eye towards including them in future episodes should there be any future episodes.”

Added executive producer/director Moira Demos on a potential continuation: “This story is ongoing. These cases are open. But it’s real life. You don’t know what’s going to happen. If there are significant developments, we will be there.” (Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos hinted earlier on Sunday that Season 2 is a possibility.)

As for whether Avery has seen the program that has made him a national talking point, “Steven does not have access to the series,” Ricciardi said. “He asked the warden and his social worker if he would be able to see it, and his request was denied. When we spoke to him recently, his focus was mainly on his case,” which included representing himself on an appeal to a motion he lost.