Being Mary Jane Season Finale

Being Mary Jane Recap: Racial Conflicts Hit Home in Devastating Season Finale

Being Mary Jane has spent all season shattering viewers’ expectations, and the BET drama saved its most jaw-dropping twist for the closing moments of Tuesday’s game-changing finale.

lot went down in the final hour of Season 3 — and I’ll get to all of it, I promise — but I wouldn’t be doing this jaw-dropping episode justice if I didn’t begin by discussing that last scene: Niecy’s questionable stop and disturbing assault by a white police officer.

I don’t even mind that it came out of nowhere; this show has always thrived on surprising its audience with powerful, relevant and, unfortunately, all-too-real stories. And Niecy’s brutal ordeal was the kind of scene you feel compelled to watch multiple times, knowing full well that it’s going to be just as uncomfortable and difficult to process with each viewing.

I’m also curious to see how the incident will affect Mary Jane’s family, should BET decide to renew the show for a fourth season. Will it keep Niecy from achieving her goals? Will it force MJ to take a public stand? (I feel like that second one is pretty much a given.)

Elsewhere in the episode…

* Can Mary Jane somehow get a restraining order on her past? In this final hour alone, she was faced with two reminders of her complicated history with David — his mother dropped by MJ’s house to tell her that David still loves her, and MJ bumped into David (with his wife and child) during a night out with Kara — but thanks to Mary J. Blige’s “No More Drama” playing on a loop in her head, MJ resisted succumbing to her usual brand of self-destructive coping mechanisms. I’m actually really proud of her.

MJ is visited by Simone, then bumps into David in public. Simone comes to MJ’s house to tell her about David’s baby. She’s crazy. She came to tell her that David still loves her and he never stopped. David knows he messed up. He’s beyond sorry. “No more drama.” “You want what you want, and to hell with anyone else’s pain.” Amazing tell-off.

* Mary Jane’s brief foray into the world of white dudes has ended before it even truly began. She may have been willing to defend interracial romance on national TV — her relationship with Eddie became a national talking point, even ending up as a hot topic on The Real — but there was one thing she couldn’t get past: his inability to fully understand her daily struggle, which MJ now believes no white man ever can. “I like black men,” she told him. “I like black love.” Unsurprisingly, his surrender came shortly thereafter.

* Mary Jane finally got Cece out of her life — and more importantly out of her wallet — by setting up a fake interview for a book about their experience together. Getting Cece to detail her extortion plot (on the record) ensured that MJ’s season-long rival would be leaving the building in handcuffs. But CeCe, ever the classiest dame on all of television, made a graceful exit, offering a tip of her hat to her victorious rival — though that was after she called MJ a “slutty drunk bitch” and accused her of killing Lisa. That part wasn’t so classy.

* Kara was called on the carpet for accusing Marisol of having an affair with Greg, who threatened to fire her if she didn’t straighten things out. But when Kara attempted (poorly) to make the conflict go away, she was presented with a most unfortunate stipulation: Marisol will only drop it if she’s offered the anchor spot on Kara’s new show. Dun, dun, dun!


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18 Comments
  1. @endurance97 says:

    I have to say that it was cathartic watching Mary Jane clean house and clean up her life this 3rd season. And MJB’s “No More Drama” was the perfect score for the finale. I can’t imagine the show not being renewed. I can’t wait to see what happens next.

    • @endurance97 says:

      Oh! And I’ll start the campaign for an Emmy nomination for Loretta Devine!

      • Bmjfan says:

        Yessssss to an Emmy for Loretta Devine. I only hope that she is not overlooked because this show comes on BET. That was some of the best work I’ve ever seen her do and that’s saying a lot, given her resume.

      • Marlyn says:

        Agreed! She did absolutely incredible in this role and it is so different from any role she has had before. Brilliant! If people didn’t know her talents before she removed any doubt from anybody now.

    • William says:

      COMPLETELY AGREE. I was smiling heavy throughout this episode because it became clear to me that MJ finally got her act together. The accident gave her perspective and from there she took the time to emotionally grow. It’s what I wanted for the longest time and I’m glad I can finally see it in action. And I’m HERE for Loretta snatching that Emmy. Such underrated talent.

  2. William says:

    This was the best season of BMJ thus far. The shift in focus from her romantic entanglements to her self-actualizing journey helped the show in my opinion. Not to mention, the depiction of pressing issues affecting the black community allowed viewers to join the conversation – which is very important considering the stigma surrounding them. I hope Mara Brock Akil keeps up the good work with her raw storytelling next year because BMJ has the potential to soar even higher.

  3. Dani says:

    I also totally agree! Loretta is such a scene stealer and I love it. She had a way of making you like her even though she was crazy, manipulative and outrageous. I really love the way the season ended for MJ. She’s growing!
    Can we talk about Marisol and Kara?! That “Chiquita Banana” in Kara’s words is something else. I can’t imagine the impact this is going to have on MJs family. That last scene was hard to watch and I was terrified that something was going to happen to her kids.

  4. Ohhellyes says:

    I a look have to agree that this was my favorite season as well. The storytelling was very refreshing. Great job Mara!

  5. Coal says:

    Truth. For me Gabriel Union deserved an Emmy nomination for her work on Being Mary Jane ahead of Taraji P. Henson and Viola Davies. Not taking away anything from Henson and Davies, but Empire and How to get away with murder mostly rely on sensationalism and outlandish plots to tell their story while Being Mary Jane as whole tells a emotive, thoughtful and honest story.

  6. Kafiyahbelloi@yahoo.com says:

    First, I want to say Thank you to Andy Swift and TVLine for recapping such an excellent and well written show. The show has steadily gotten better. I also would like to throw Loretta Devine into the Emmy mix (I know it will never happen), because she has simply killed the game. Mara Brock Akil, keep it up.

  7. jackie says:

    I can’t wait for the next season. I think MJ is finally on the road to finding herself. Looking for purpose in it all. ..go MJ… sidebar…I love, love, love her wardrobe.

  8. Laura says:

    Very disappointed. I live in a big city like the MJ character and some of my closest friends are in very loving, successful interracial marriages (black/white), several over 20 years. I’m white and was taught “love is blind” and shouldn’t matter. MJ’s reasoning for breaking up with her white lover is, in my opinion, racist…and shallow. There are many good reasons to break up with someone…this should not be one of them. To push this attitude is to take a step backward in racial equality. Its about the content of a man’s character and not the color of his skin, right MJ? Or are you smarter than MLK? Sheesh.

    • Jordyn says:

      I totally agree. I made that mistake in my 20’s thinking that only ‘black love’ would work in the long run, and ended an awesome relationship. Yes, there are times when you may feel as if your non-minority better half doesn’t have a clue, but it’s in those moments, communication is key. It was a cop out for MJ to say she didn’t want to have to talk about it (race) and/or explain it.

    • Nailah says:

      I understand what you are saying, I agree love is blind, if you love someone it doesn’t matter what color they’re skin is, it is the content of they’re character that matters. However, what is delicate and sometime difficult to understand is that MJ is expressing to someone she is considering getting to know on a deeper level that she feels that he does not understand the internal and external experiences and struggles that she is confronted with every day as a Black woman, it is difficult for some Caucasian people to accept that there are some injustices, judgement (interracial and interracial), injustices that they may never fully understand or experience because they don’t encounter those experiences on a daily basis because of the color of there skin. It is okay to accept this. She didn’t say: I love you but I can’t be with you because you are white man, she said I like you but it is clear that we don’t see eye to eye on issues and painful experiences that affect me, and I don’t think I can or want to explain this to you in a way that you can fully process and understand what I go through every day at work, in my community and in life. Not every interracial relationship has these feelings surface because everyone is different and everyone has a different paradigm

    • Maryam says:

      I agree with you Laura when you say love is blind and colour shouldn’t matter. However I lean towards Nalilah’s argument in that it more about the experience and the issues attached to being of a particular group that can make it difficult to communicate them to someone of a different group with different experiences. I do believe that communication is key because lets face it- every individual has a unique set of experiences and issues and its necessary to be able to communicate them properly in order to forge a good bond/ connection. What I took from MJ’s speech was that she already had these types of conversations everywhere else & would prefer to not HAVE to do that in a relationship where she would be able to be fully vulnerable without having to explain herself first. Being a psychologist I can somewhat relate to what she’s saying there as I often find I have to explain to those in my personal life why it can be exhausting having conversations around motivations behind people’s behaviours because I do that all the time in other settings & its nice to take a break from that during my “down time”. Its also possible that MJs’s need for black love may come from wanting to share what her parents share. If i recall correctly a few episodes back she mentioned that her parents had modelled the type of relationship that didn’t seem to be common between black couples & she was looking to experience that. Side not: I like that this show is opens up the possibility to have conversations like this.

    • LB says:

      I agree. I think that’s the point they were trying to make in Kara’s marriage. When she had the conversation with her husband and realized that he is just like her father. She married a white man thinking it would be different and still ended up in the same type of marriage as her mother.

  9. Miss L says:

    I love being Mary jane but I was highly offended about how they are painting Nigeria. I’ve stayed in Nigeria for 9 years now and Boko haram hasn’t killed me. Boko haram only affected the northern part of Nigeria not the whole thing. The script writers are making it seem as if it’s the whole Nigeria that is affected by Boko haram. Please they should get facts straight before making a scrip on someone’s country.

  10. Alisha says:

    I can’t wait til Mary Jane show come back on I wanted to see what happen after her niece went to jail that was crazy how the house is gonna change sense the mom is gone how every one gonna get along