Scoop: Georgina Rylance Exits Fox's Broadchurch Adaptation Gracepoint; Role Being Recast

Georgina Rylance GracepointGeorgina Rylance will not be relocating to Gracepoint after all.

The English actress, who was set to play flirty hotel owner Gemma in Fox’s Broadchurch adaptation, is leaving the 10-episode mystery-drama for creative reasons, TVLine has learned. The role will be recast.

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Gracepoint, which began filming last month on Vancouver Island in Victoria, boasts an impressive cast that includes Doctor Who‘s David Tennant (who also headlines Broadchurch), Breaking Bad‘s Anna Gunn, Jacki Weaver (Silver Linings Playbook), Michael Peña and Nick Nolte. 

It’s scheduled for broadcast during the 2014-2015 season.

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21 Comments
  1. uh huh says:

    And it’s completely unnecessary. We Americans are perfectly capable of understanding British and Scottish accents. The original was fantastic. No need for a “remake.”

    • prish says:

      I guess it is going to have a different ending. I didn’t watch it, but I imagine fans would like another take on it. I am such a Sherlock Holmes junkie, enjoying every vision and adaptation made, film and tv.

    • Ani says:

      As an Australian, I have no problem with American remakes. They make tv shows more accessible, and take nothing away from the original. As a fan of the office, the killing and the bridge, which are all remakes, Im looking forward to this one, because while I like the premise, I just can’t lose myself I’m british tv like I can with American shows.

      • Meg says:

        ^^ You can’t lose yourself in a British show the way you can with an American one!!! I mean obviously you’re entitled to your opinion but I find it a really weird one. Is it the American accent that makes it easier for you? The larger budget? A slightly less complex plot to follow? Some remakes are good but there’s no escaping the fact that they are inherently lacking originality from taking a plot that’s already been done and I wish there was less of them. Personally I don’t think the performances from Broadchurch can be beat.

        • MikaC says:

          You’re right, the performances were brilliant. But the writing started to drag about halfway through, when the suspect-of-the-week formula became so obvious. But I guess that’s what happens when you try to stretch one story over 8 weeks. (It really could have been told in half the time.)

          I’m looking forward to a new take on the story.

        • dude says:

          I think it depends on the project. Sometimes changing the location of a remake totally changes the show in an exciting way. If it’s the same show with a different accent though, yeah I’m not crazy about that.

        • Sometimes remakes can be better. Sanford & Son, All In The Family, Wilfred, Veep, Three’s Company and several others. I think what the best of these did was take the original show and go in their own directions, with more opportunities for their talented casts to break the mold and explore stories the original writers never could have thought of. And come on, David Tennant is in the new version. I have to hope that it won’t be a carbon copy with a different ending.
          .
          What I don’t like are film remakes. Sometimes they’re good, sometimes they’re even better, but most of the time, it’s the exact same thing with more money and worse actors and writing. They’re just creative black holes, especially compared to how some TV remakes turn out.

    • DGSAFDMD says:

      AMEN ^

    • Whiskey says:

      Thank you! I’ve been annoyed by this remake since they announced it.

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  3. Meg says:

    ^^ You can’t lose yourself in a British show the way you can with an American one!!! I mean obviously you’re entitled to your opinion but I find it a really weird one. Is it the American accent that makes it easier for you? The larger budget? A slightly less complex plot to follow? Some remakes are good but there’s no escaping the fact that they are inherently lacking originality from taking a plot that’s already been done and I wish there was less of them. Personally I don’t think the performances from Broadchurch can be beat.

    • Ani says:

      American tv is just what I grew up watching, so it is what I prefer to watch. I’m not saying british, euro and even australian tv can’t be good, as I’ve watched and enjoyed shows they produce, and they are often more complex and realistic. It is just my personal preference to watch American produced tv, and wherever the stories originate doesn’t matter, as I would rather watch a great show that is a remake than a subpar original, which I will admit, I’ve seen plenty of coming out of America.

  4. Kelly says:

    Two words – Billie Piper! Let’s have David and Billie work together again.

  5. Tai says:

    I enjoyed Broadchurch and am probably going to enjoy this as well. I will never understand the concept of hating or being bothered by something that hasn’t even aired yet. It sounds like there are a lot of talented people involved in this project. Who cares that it’s a remake? Now it’s just more accessible for people who couldn’t watch the original for whatever reason (and there are plenty of legit reasons).

    • Ani says:

      Exactly! Nothing against british/euro shows, but I grew up on American tv, and its what I prefer to watch. Im not unintelligent or uncultured, but I know what I like, and I’m not ashamed to admit it. I think the combo of british/euro stories with American production works well. Re films, remakes aren’t always as successful, as in the instance of the girl with a dragon tattoo. While beautifully shot, the remake was missing some essential essence that the original contained.

    • Bob Johnson says:

      Some people just like to complain, Tai.

  6. soundscene says:

    I’m excited. I love British TV and I love American TV. They’re different, but I honestly don’t think one is overall better than the other. In America, we tend to see what is considered “the best” of British TV. I’m wondering whether some Americans watching BBC America or PBS don’t have a skewed view of the overall quality of British TV. The UK, on the other hand, tends to get far more American TV than Americans get of British TV.
    *
    American TV has made good remakes of TV shows from the UK. House of Cards, Veep, All in the Family, Dear John, Being Human, Three’s Company, and The Office, among others, plus a whole host of reality shows (admittedly, some good and some not, although their British counterparts are generally of the same quality). *Most* American TV pilots and series fail within the first season. The fact that pilots and series of British remakes also fail more than succeed really doesn’t say anything–TV is a tough business. And it’s not like the UK doesn’t remake American TV (there have been British versions of Law & Order, Mad About You, The Golden Girls, Good Times, Maude, Grounded for Life, Married…With Children, That 70’s Show, Who’s The Boss, among others, plus a lot of reality shows).
    *
    Broadchurch isn’t sacred. The vitriol regarding Gracepoint seems a little overdone and way premature. The producers are changing the ending; they’ve hired a fantastic cast; and they’re keeping to the short series format, which should prevent the common criticism that American TV drags out stories too long. At least wait until it airs (and try to watch it) before bringing out the pitchforks.

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